72% drop of refugees admitted into the United States under Trump

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Submitted to The United West by Gerald Lostutter, February 16, 2018

There is a 72% drop of refugees admitted into the United States under President Trump. Refugees – totaling 27,975 – were admitted during Trump’s first year. Contrast: 99,275 refugees were admitted during Obama’s last year.1 Totals exclude Asylums2 and Special Immigrant Visas.3

The drop of refugees is attributed to President Trump’s rhetoric. Despite legal challenges, the last relevant Executive Order 6 required a brief suspension of entry by certain travelers “to conduct a 120-day review 7 of the USRAP [United States Refugee Admissions Program] application and adjudication process … to determine, and implement, additional procedures to ensure that individuals seeking admission as refugees do not pose a threat to [our] … security and welfare.”

An end to the “ad hoc approach” to refugee admissions and resettlement was intended via the Refugee Act (1980), amending the Immigration and Nationality Act (1952).8

Who is a refugee?

Any “person who is outside … [his] country …, and who is unable or unwilling to return … because of persecution or a well-founded fear [thereof] … on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a … social group, or political opinion.” In consult with Congress, the President may specify a person (or class).8

Taxpayers’ burden for refugees’ “room and board”

In his earlier Executive Order,9 Trump requires two reports from the State Dept: (1) “a report detailing the estimated long-term costs of the USRAP … with recommendations … to curtail those costs”; and (2) “a report estimating how many refugees are being supported in countries of first asylum (near their home countries) for the same long-term cost as supporting refugees in the United States.” 10

Refugee Processing and Resettlement has cost (FY17), and will cost (FY18), estimated more than a billion dollars for each fiscal year.12 Last year (FY17),  add social and medical services, the final cost is more than two billion dollars 13 in the Refugee and Entrant Assistance account.

Refugees are eligible for federal public assistance, such as: (a) Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for the Aged, Blind, and Disabled: Eligible for 7 or 9 years; (b) Medicaid (non-emergency care): Eligible for 7 years, then state option; (c)  Temporary Assistance for Needy Families: Eligible for 5 years, then state option; and (d) Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program [SNAP, formerly Food Stamps]: Eligible without any limit of time.14 Absent eligibility for federal programs, refugees are eligible for state administered public assistance, such as refugee cash assistance (RCA) and refugee medical assistance (RMA), for 8 months.15

What are the risks of security?

The United States’ “humanitarian concern,” 16 via USRAP, is managed by the Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM), but coordinated with the Department of Homeland Security, specifically its U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. 17

Unlike U. S. technological superiority, most countries’ governments and police agencies are substandard, nonexistent, or subject to Taqiyya: Lying to infidels to advance the cause of Islam.20

“UNHCR estimates that there are at least 10 million people worldwide who are not recognized as nationals of any state … [:] stateless.” 21 “The 1990s break-up of the Soviet Union created newly independent states with sizeable populations of stateless individuals due to gaps in nationality laws.” 22

“[T]he referring entity (usually UNHCR) provides the biographical data of eligible applicants for processing.” 23 Agencies can not rely solely on name and fingerprint checks. “[Starting in 2014, Dept. of Homeland Security / U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)] introduced Syrian Enhanced Review to provide intelligence-driven support … [and] now includes social media checks.” 24 “[More] in-depth review is needed … [for] refugees of 11 nationalities identified as potentially posing a higher risk.” But “the names of the 11 countries remain classified.” 25

May a state refuse admission of refugees?

States, and their citizens, have been “blind-sided” by the sudden arrival of refugees. “Although ORR [HHS’ Office of Refugee Resettlement] is statutorily required to consult with the states ‘regularly’ about the ‘intended distribution of refugees … before their placement’ in the state, it is not required to obtain a state’s approval before their placing a refugee within the state’s jurisdiction.” 26

“The agency administering the R&P [DOS’ Reception and Placement] Program is further required to consider the recommendations of the state in determining where to place refugees.” 27

It is possible for a state to refuse, or suspend receipt of, direct federal funding for refugees, pursuant to the Tenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.28

However, “aliens, as well as citizens” have the “right to travel between states.” 29 Liberal courts have extended “privileges and immunities” to non-citizens, aka “lawful permanent residents,” as one interpretation of the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

“As of May 31, 2017, in FY2017, refugee arrivals have been placed in the District of Columbia and every state except Wyoming. In FY2016, the only states with no refugee placements were Delaware and Hawaii … Once refugees are in the United States, however, they do not have to remain in their initial placement area. They can relocate at any time.” 30

Refugee Resettlement is Big Business

The Health and Human Services’ “voluntary agencies” 31 have offices using federal funds, or  state-level funds. “The nine organizations maintain a nationwide network of 328 affiliated offices in 191 locations … Two of the organizations also maintain a network of 30 affiliated offices in 29 locations … [for] unaccompanied refugee minors .” 32 “[T]wo states – Wyoming and Mississippi – have no local affiliates, but refugees can still be settled in these states through the remote placement process.” 33

“For FY2017, the per-refugee grant is $2,075. Of this total, $1,125 must be used for direct support of refugees and $950 is available to the local affiliate to spend on its staff and infrastructure.” 34 Example: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) and Affiliates, in its Consolidated Financial Statements, under (3) Migration and Refugee Services and Programs, reported a “Total government contract and grants revenue” of $95,256,272, which is about 39% of the “Total operating revenues, gains and other support” of $246,533,421 for period ending Dec. 31, 2016. 35

An examination of selected countries

“In 2016, UNHCR [United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees] referred refugees to 37 countries … Over 90 percent … were referred to the United States, Australia, and Canada … The United States is … the largest single donor to UNHCR, providing over $1.5 billion” in FY16.36

“In 2016, the USRAP [United States Refugee Admissions  Program] admitted 84,994 refugees from 68 countries. More than half were originally from either the Democratic Republic of Congo or Syria.” 37 Many refugees migrate through several countries before reaching the United States.

Playing the system: “individuals illegally residing in the United States who are placed in removal proceedings with EOIR [U.S. Department of Justice’s Executive Office for Immigration Review] may file an asylum application with EOIR as a defense to removal, even if the person has not previously filed an affirmative asylum application with USCIS.” 41

During FY17, the U.S. admitted “refugees of nearly 30 African nationalities.” 42 Due to fraud, Priority 3 cases were suspended in some areas in 2008. It “resumed in Oct. 2012 with a new AOR [Affidavit of Relationship] form and requirement for DNA evidence of certain claimed biological parent-child relationships.” 43

In the Republic of Congo, “[t]he constitution states the country is secular [and] provides for freedom of belief … [Yet] All organizations, including religious groups, must register with and be approved by the Ministry of Interior … Many residents not included in government statistics are foreign workers from predominately Muslim countries, primarily in West Africa.” 44

“FY2018 admissions are expected to consist mainly of Burmese refugees living in Malaysia and Thailand.” 45 In Burma (Myanmar), “there is no official state religion … [but] the constitution notes that the government ‘recognizes the special position of Buddhism … by the great majority of the citizens.’” 46

A Burmese crime: “New Zealander Philip Blackwood was released from prison in January [, 2016]. Blackwood and two Burmese colleagues, Htut Ko Ko Lwin and Tun Thurein, were sentenced in 2015 to two and a half years of hard labor for posting an image to Facebook of the Buddha wearing headphones to promote their bar in Rangoon, and had been charged with insulting religion.” 48

“In Ukraine, fighting between Ukrainian troops and … Russia-led forces continues despite the signing of numerous ceasefire agreements. Russia’s attempted annexation and occupation of Crimea, and the fighting in parts of eastern Ukraine have resulted in over 2 million people displaced from their homes.” 50

“Widespread border closures throughout Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s … Aegean activity, and the European Union’s agreement with Turkey to stem dangerous outmigration [sic] from Turkey led to the relative stabilization of Europe’s refugee and migration crisis in 2016 … The United States has contributed $74 million to international organizations in response to the Europe Migration crisis since 2016.” 51

“The ongoing conflict in Colombia generates the largest numbers of refugees and IDPs [Internally Displaced Persons] in the region, and the second largest worldwide. The Government of Colombia  … reports 7.2 million IDPs.” [03/17]. The Columbian congress approved a peace settlement with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia. [11/16] 52

“FY2018 admissions from this region are expected to include Cubans as well as minors from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras gaining admission under the Central American Minors (CAM) refugee program.” 53 However, CAM will be phased out in FY18. 54

In Iraq: “Since the start of FY 2014, the United States has provided nearly $1.7 billion in essential humanitarian assistance.” 55

In Syria: “The U.S. Government, the largest global donor, had provided nearly $7.4 billion in critical humanitarian assistance since the start of the Syria crisis.” 56

In Iraq: “Christian, Yezidi, and Kaka’i community leaders said that forced conversion was the defacto result of the national identity card law, which stated that children of one Muslim parent would be automatically identified as Muslim. Christian leaders said, in some cases, families formally registered as Muslim, but actually practicing Christianity or another faith, reportedly fled to avoid being forced to register their child as Muslim or to have the child remain undocumented.” 57

“ISIS [Islamic State of Iraq and Syria] killed dozens through public executions, crucifixions, and beheadings of men, women and children on charges of apostasy, blasphemy, homosexuality, and cursing God. In Raqqa and elsewhere in Syria, ISIS continued to hold thousands of enslaved Yezidi women and girls kidnapped in Iraq and trafficked to Syria to be sold or distributed to ISIS members as ‘spoils of war’ because of their religious beliefs.” 58 Translated: As instructed by Muhammad!

“In February 2016, direct access (Priority 2) to the USRAP [United States Refugee Admissions Program] was extended to Syrian beneficiaries of approved I-130 Petition for Alien Relatives and their derivatives.” 59

Summary

Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration; and the Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services “will work closely with [the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees] to ensure that, in addition to referrals of refugees with compelling protection needs, referrals may also take into account certain criteria that enhance a refugee’s likelihood of successful assimilation and contribution to the United States.” 60

Many refugees migrate through several countries before reaching the United States. Borrowing an airline metaphor: Many refugees have a “lay over” from an Islamic country to a Christian country, where they are picked-up by UNHCR for transfer to the United States.

The United States is a “melting pot” of cultures who accept the U.S. Constitution’s Bill of Rights: Liberty as identified by freedoms of conscience, association, religion, and keeping arms for self-defense. Our laws protect the rights of minorities, women, homosexuality, etc.

The antithesis is Islam, a political system wrapped in religion. You must submit to Allah as interpreted by Muhammad, a self-identified con artist, thief, murderer, and pedophile. Sharia law, particularly on blasphemy, prohibits individual freedoms. Capital punishment and honor killings  are routinely used against apostasy, women who fail to follow orders by men, homosexuality, etc.

Is it possible for a Muslim with a barbaric 7th century world view to assimilate to a libertarian 21st century world view? To do so would require a Muslim to renounce a core principle against infidels: (1) convert to Islam; or (2) live as a second-class citizen and pay a tax to Muslims; or (3) die.

Islam is incompatible with the U.S. Constitution. Yet, United States bureaucracies apparently have “Obama hold-overs” who favor Islamic refugees. Why? Consider a theory of “civilization jihad” proffered by Ann Corcoran in her book, Refugee Resettlement and the Hijra to America: 61

“Solomon and Al Maqdisi emphasize again and again the primary goal of the Hijra:

‘…from the Islamic jurisprudence view the immigration of the Muslims to the West is to be regarded as the most important step on the ladder for achieving the establishment of an Islamic state in the West. This is the primary objective of Islamic mission in the West.’ 62

[E]verything we see happening as the Muslim population grows is part of a carefully crafted and elaborate plan to bring about sharia and ultimately the complete domination of our [U.S.] government and society by Islamic Law. To successfully dominate us, it is obvious that they need an ever-increasing number of Islamic adherents in order to carry out the next steps.63

WHAT WILL YOU DO TO STOP SHARIA LAW?

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Gerald Lostutter is a Florida licensed attorney, college professor, and journalist. He has worked in the print and broadcast media.

1 A Fiscal Year is from October through September: FY16: Oct, ‘15 – Sept, ‘16; FY17: Oct, ‘16 – Sept, ‘17; and FY18: Oct, ‘17 – Sept, ‘18. Calculations by months: Obama: 02/16 – 1/17. Trump: 02/17 – 01/18. Trump was inaugurated Jan. 20, 2017. Calculations by months possible via this table from the Department of State; Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration; Office of Admissions – Refugee Processing Center: Fiscal Year 2018 as of 31-Jan-18. This table reports Refugee Admissions Ceiling, and FY Total Admitted into the U.S, Admissions by Month, for FY 2008 – FY 2018. Calculations also by tables listed in note 4. Sources: U.S. Dept. of State: http://www.state.gov and Refugee Processing Center: http://wrapsnet.org/admissions-and-arrivals/

2 Calculations by months unavailable: Previous years’ reports indicate totals only by years. The Refugee Ceiling excludes Asylees, which have no numerical limit. Andorra Bruno, Refugee Admissions and Resettlement Policy, Refugee Admissions, Note 8, p. 2, Congressional Research Service Report RL31269, (11-07-17). Sources: https://www.loc.gov/crsinfo/ and https://archive.org

https://archive.org/details/RL31269/RefugeeAdmissionsandResettlementPolicy-crs

3 The Special Immigrant Visa program primarily concern Afghanistan and Iraq: Nationals who have assisted the U.S. Government, and seek Lawful Permanent Residence in the United States. Andorra Bruno, Reception and Placement of Refugees in the United States, Initial Resettlement Assistance, Note 8, p. 2, Congressional Research Service Report R44878, (06-21-17). Source: Federation of American Scientists: https://fas.org/sgp/crs/homesec/R44878.pdf Also see, Andorra Bruno, Iraqi and Afghan Special Immigrant Visa Programs, Congressional Research Service Report R43725, (02-26-16). https://fas.org/sgp/crs/homesec/R43725.pdf

4 See note 1. Calculations by months possible via these tables: Department of State; Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration; Office of Admissions – Refugee Processing Center: First Table: Refugee Arrivals by Region (based on Nationality of PA) All Nationalities, October 01, 2017 through January 31, 2018; Source: Refuge Processing Center:  http://wrapsnet.org/admissions-and-arrivals/ Scroll down to first subheading: Arrivals by Region. Click on Arrivals by Region as of February 12, 2018. Second Table: Excel spreadsheet: Refugee+Admissions+Report+2017_12_31. Summary of Refugee Admissions as of 31-December-2017. This table reports Country of Chargeability [by Area], Refugee Admissions Ceiling, and FY Total Admitted into the U.S, Refugee Admissions by Month, for FY 2001 – FY 2018. Source: Refuge Processing Center: http://wrapsnet.org/admissions-and-arrivals/ Scroll down to fifth subheading: Admission Reports. Click on Refugee Admissions Report January 31, 2018.

5 Proposed Refugee Admissions for Fiscal Year 2018, Report to the Congress, Submitted on Behalf of the President of the United States to the Committees on the Judiciary [of the] United States Senate and United States House of Representatives, III. Refugee Admissions Program for FY2018, Proposed Ceilings, Table III: Refugee Admissions in FY 2016 and FY 2017, Proposed Refugee Admissions by Region for FY 2018, p. 6. Prepared by United States Department of State; United States Department of Homeland Security; and United States Department of Health and Human Services. (Released 10-04-17). Source: U.S. Department of State: https://www.state.gov/documents/organization/274857.pdf Alternate location:

https://assets.documentcloud.org/documents/4063604/Report-to-Congress-Proposed-Refugee-Admissions.pdf

6 Presidential Order on Resuming the United States Refugee Admissions Program with Advanced Vetting Capabilities  [EO 13815; 10-24-17], referring to, Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States [EO 13780; 03-06-17]. Source: The White House: https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/presidential-executive-order-resuming-united-states-refugee-admissions-program-enhanced-vetting-capabilities/

7 “The 120-day suspension was in effect from June 26, 2017, until its expiration on October 24, 2017.” Bruno, Refugee, Refugee Admissions, p.3, CRS Report RL31269, supra, note 2.

8 Immigration and Nationality Act [INA], 8 U.S.C. 1101; Section §101(a)42(A) and (B). Source: U.S. Government Printing Office: https://gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/USCODE-2016-title8/pdf/USCODE-2016-title8-chap12-subchapI-sec1101.pdf

9 EO 13780 (03-06-17). Source: U.S. Government Printing Office:

https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-03-09/pdf/2017-04837.pdf

10 The first report is produced by the Secretary of State in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services,  the Secretary of Homeland Security, and the Director of Management and Budget. The second report is produced by the Secretary of State in consultation with the Director of Management and Budget. Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, VI. Anticipated Social, Economic, and Demographic Impact of Refugee Admissions, p. 54, supra, note 5.

11 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, I. Overview of Refugee Policy, p. 1, supra, note 5.

12 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Table IX: Estimated Available Funding for Refugee Processing and Resettlement FY2017 and FY2018, p. 63, supra, note 5.

13 “For FY2017, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017, which included appropriations for the Department of Labor, HHS [Health and Human Services], and Education, and related agencies, provided $1.675 billion for ORR [Office of Refugee Resettlement] programs. This funding was supplemented by $467 million in transferred funds from within HHS, for a total FY2017 funding of $2.141 billion.” Supra, Bruno, Refugee, Refugee Resettlement Assistance; and Table 2. Refugee Resettlement Funding, FY2008-FY2017, p.10, CRS Report RL31269, supra, note 2.

14 Bruno, Refugee, Refugee Resettlement Assistance, Table 3. Refugee Eligibility for Major Federal Public Assistance Programs, p.11, CRS Report RL31269, supra, note 2.

15 Bruno, Refugee, Refugee Resettlement Assistance, p.11, CRS Report RL31269, supra, note 2.

16 Immigration and Nationality Act [INA], 8 U.S.C. 1157; Section §207(a)(3), supra, note 8. Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services:

http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1626.html

17 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Admission Procedures, Eligibility Criteria, p. 7, supra, note 5.

18 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Admission Procedures, Eligibility Criteria, p. 7, supra, note 5.

19 FY18: “[P]rocessing is available to nationals of 15 countries [:] Afghanistan, Burundi, Central African Republic, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Mali, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, and Syria.” Supra, Bruno, Refugee, Refugee Processing Priorities, p. 6, CRS Report RL31269, supra, note 2.

20 Gregory Davis, Islam 101, Jihad Watch, Edited by Robert Spencer. https://www.jihadwatch.org/islam-101

21 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, I. Overview of U.S. Refugee Policy, p. 2, supra, note 5.

22 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Europe and Central Asia, Statelessness, p. 35, supra, note 5.

23  Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Admission Procedures, Eligibility Criteria, Priority 2 – Group Referrals, p. 9, supra, note 5.

24 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), Background Security Checks, pgs. 15-16, supra, note 5.

25 Quoting: U.S. Department of State, Status of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program, fact sheet, Oct. 24, 2017; and, email from DOS to CRS, Oct. 31, 2017. Bruno, Refugee, p.3, CRS Report RL31269, supra, note 2.

26 Can States and Localities Bar the Resettlement of Syrian Refugees within Their Jurisdictions? Legal Sidebar, Congressional Research Service Reports and Analysis, WSLG1440 (11-18-15). Source: Federation of American Scientists: https://fas.org/sgp/crs/homesec/resettle.pdf

27 Bruno, Reception, Summary, CRS Report R44878, supra, note 3. See 8 U.S.C. §1522(a)(2)(D).

Source: Government Printing Office:

https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/USCODE-2016-title8/pdf/USCODE-2016-title8-chap12-subchapIV-sec1522.pdf

28 “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” Amendment X, U.S. Constitution. Source: Government Printing Office: https://www.congress.gov/content/conan/pdf/GPO-CONAN-REV-2016-10-11.pdf

29 Can States and Localities Bar the Resettlement…?, CRS Reports and Analysis, WSLG1440, supra, note 26.

30 Bruno, Reception, Summary, CRS Report R44878, supra, note 3.

31 Church World Service (CWS), Ethiopian Community Development Council (ECDC), Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM),  Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS), International Rescue Committee (IRC), US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (USCRI), Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Services (LIRS), United States Conference of Catholic Bishops  (USCCB), World Relief Corporation (WRC). Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Refugee Resettlement (Published 07-17-12): https://www.acf.hhs.gov/orr/resource/voluntary-agencies

32 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Department of State, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM), Reception and Placement, p. 18, supra, note 5.

33 Bruno, Reception, Initial Resettlement Assistance, Remote Placement, p. 4, CRS Report R44878, supra, note 3.

34 Bruno, Reception, Funding, p. 4, CRS Report R44878, supra, note 3.

35 United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Affiliates, Consolidated Financial Statements with Schedules, December 31, 2016 and 2015; Consolidated Statement of Activities, p. 4; and Notes: (3) Migration and Refugee Services and Programs, p. 14. Source: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (Accessed 02-12-18):

http://www.usccb.org/about/financial-reporting/upload/financial-statements-2015-2016.pdf

36 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, I. Overview of Refugee Policy, p. 2, supra, note 5.

37 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, VII. Refugee Admissions for Fiscal Year 2016, p. 54, supra, note 5.

38 Bruno, Refugee, FY2018 Refugee Ceiling and Allocations, p.5, CRS Report RL31269, supra, note 2.

 39 International Religious Freedom Reports by U.S. Dept. of State, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor:

https://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/irf/religiousfreedom/index.htm#wrapper

40 International Religious Freedom Act of 1998, 112. Stat. 2787, 22 U.S.C. 6401.

https://www.gpo,gov/fdsys/pkg/USCODE-2016-title22/pdf/USCODE-2016-title22-chap73.pdf

41 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, II. Overview of U.S. Affirmative Asylum Processing, footnote 2, p. 4, supra, n.5.

42 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Africa, FY2017 U.S. Admissions, p. 27, supra, note 5.

43 Bruno, Refugee, Refugee Processing Priorities, p.7, CRS Report RL31269, supra, note 2.

44 Republic of the Congo 2016 International Religious Freedom Report, pgs. 1-2, United States Department of State; Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor. http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/268882.pdf

45 Bruno, Refugee, FY2018 Refugee Ceiling and Allocations, p.5, CRS Report RL31269, supra, note 2.

46 Burma 2016 International Religious Freedom Report, p. 4, United States Department of State; Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor. https://www.state.gov/documents/organization/268962.pdf

47 North Korean Human Rights Act of 2004, 118 Stat. 1287.

http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/BILLS-108hr4011enr/pdf/BILLS-108hr4011enr.pdf

48 Burma 2016 IRFR, p. 6, supra, note 2.

49 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act FY 1990 (Lautenberg Amendment) and Consolidated Appropriations Act 2004 (added Specter Amendment). Supra, footnote 2: Bruno, Refugee Admissions, Lautenberg Amendment and Specter Amendment, p.9, CRS Report RL31269.

50 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Europe and Central Asia, Ukraine, p. 33, supra, note 5.

51 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Europe and Central Asia, Europe Refugee and Migrant Crisis, p. 33-34, supra, n.5.

52 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Latin America and the Caribbean, p. 39, supra, note 5.

53 Bruno, Refugee, FY2018 Refugee Ceiling and Allocations, p.5, CRS Report RL31269, supra, note 5. Also, U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, Central American Minors Program:

http://www.state.gov/j/prm/ra/cam/

54 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Admissions Procedures, FY2018 Priority 2 Designations, In-country Processing Program, p. 10.

55 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Near East and South Asia, p. 43.

56 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Near East and South Asia, p. 44.

57 Iraq 2016 International Religious Freedom Report, p. 11, United States Department of State; Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor. http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/269136.pdf

58 Syria 2016 International Religious Freedom Report, pgs. 1-2, United States Department of State; Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor. http://state.gov/documents/organization/269158.pdf

59 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Near East and South Asia, Third Country Resettlement, p. 51, supra, note 5.

60 Proposed Refugee Admissions ‘18, Admissions Procedures, Priority 1 – Individual Referrals, p. 8, supra, note 5.

61 Ann Corcoran, Refugee Resettlement and the Hijra to America, Vol. 2, p. 19 (Center for Security Press; 2015).

62 Ibid, Corcoran, Refugee Resettlement, quoting Solomon and Al Maqdisi, Modern Day Trojan Horse, the Islamic Doctrine of Immigration, Accepting Freedom or Imposing Islam? p. 3 (Advancing Native Missions; 2009).

63 Ibid, Corcoran, Refugee Resettlement, p. 19.